[ih] Funny how things work out

John Lowry jhlowry at mac.com
Tue Feb 2 03:06:45 PST 2021


It looks suspiciously like Relative Distinguished Names with an opportunity for an “authority” at each level.

> On Feb 1, 2021, at 6:32 PM, Joseph Touch via Internet-history <internet-history at elists.isoc.org> wrote:
> 
> 
> 
>> On Feb 1, 2021, at 2:48 PM, John Day via Internet-history <internet-history at elists.isoc.org> wrote:
>> 
>> As long as we are harping on these sorts of things, I will throw in my pet peeve, not limiting a domain request to something reasonable. For example, there is small grocery in Harvard Square called Cardullos. They have Cardullos.com <http://cardullos.com/>. They are small, they will never be nationwide, let alone worldwide. Why weren’t they asked to take Cardullos.ma.us <http://cardullos.ma.us/>?
> 
> Why not Cardullos.cambridge.ma.us <http://cardullos.boston.ci.ma.us/>?
> 
> RFC1480 has some history.
> 
> One reason is that originally those names were used for government and public entities.
> 
> At least one reason is that cambridge.ma.us might not have been delegated at the time Cardullos asked. Or ma.us <http://ma.us/> for that matter.
> 
> Then there’s the issue that Cardullos has another store in Boston, so should they also have cardullos.boston.ma.us <http://cardullos.boston.ma.us/>? Or what happens if they open another in Bristol, VT? (And what makes you think they would never be anything but local?)
> 
> To answer your original question, “because .com is where companies had DNS names” was the answer for a very long time before there were other domains.
> 
> Joe
> 
> 
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